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Poster: Chris Freedom Date: Feb 23, 2007 7:55am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: So what Dylan tunes worked for the Dead?

agreed, I was glad Jerry contributed something vocally to that song especially since he was already doing it with JGB

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Poster: bluedevil Date: Feb 23, 2007 8:13am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: So what Dylan tunes worked for the Dead?

I always enjoyed JGB doing Tangled Up in Blue. I think the liner notes to the Kean College JGB release mentions that Dylan found Garcia to be the best interpreter of his works. And, as I've posted before, I love what Dylan said about Jerry when he died:

"There's no way to measure his greatness or magnitude as a person or as a player. I don't think eulogizing will do him justice. He was that great - much more than a superb musician with an uncanny ear and dexterity. He is the very spirit personified of whatever is muddy river country at its core and screams up into the spheres. He really had no equal. To me he wasn't only a musician and friend, he was more like a big brother who taught and showed me more than he'll ever know. There are a lot of spaces and advances between the Carter Family, Buddy Holly and, say, Ornette Coleman, a lot of universes, but he filled them all without being a member of any school. His playing was moody, awesome, sophisticated, hypnotic and subtle. There's no way to convey the loss. It just digs down really deep." - Bob Dylan on Jerry Garcia's passing

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Poster: grendelschoice Date: Feb 23, 2007 8:22am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: So what Dylan tunes worked for the Dead?

Thanks for re-posting that, BD....

I think it speaks volumes that Dylan, who of course was a brilliant lyricist but often couldn't put together a coherent thought or sentence in an interview, was so eloquent on the subject of Garcia.

he sums up the man's career, influence, and spiritual importance perfectly.

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Poster: BryanE Date: Feb 23, 2007 8:43am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: So what Dylan tunes worked for the Dead?

Someone posed a question a few days ago, and pardon me for not remembering who it was, regarding how it is that Garcia has never gotten the acknowledgment he deserves as one of the great guitarists of his generation (I objectively think he WAS the greatest, with all due respect to Messrs. Hendrix, Page, Clapton, et. al., but I never felt any of them could hold a candle to Jerry's mastery of so many different styles and genres-let me have it, Jimi, Jimmy, and Eric fans). Dylan's tribute here to him should be required reading for all of the pinheads at VH1 and elsewhere who constantly insist on pigeonholing Jerry, and anyone else in the field of entertainment, for their own goal of producing their pointless Top 100 countdowns and other claptrap to fill air space.

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Poster: bluedevil Date: Feb 23, 2007 9:15am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: So what Dylan tunes worked for the Dead?

I love EC and am very excited to see him on 3/18 in San Jose - the last night Derek Trucks will be in the band and doing the Duane imitations for the Derek & Dominoes' songs. That said, I'm in 100% agreement with Bryan E in that I can't think of anyone that covers the musical terrain Jerry did. Perhaps a Ry Cooder or David Lindley type merits mention, but Jer was the best for giving you a complete overview of American musical styles within the course of an evening. Those Lunt Funtane shows still bring a smile to my face. . .

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Poster: BryanE Date: Feb 23, 2007 9:23am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: So what Dylan tunes worked for the Dead?

And don't get me wrong, either, because I love all those guys. If I dare say so, I think Page is the most well-rounded of that triumvirate. Jimi was exceptionally innovative, influencing almost anyone who picked up an electric guitar after Purple Haze first hit the airwaves. As a showman, perhaps he had no equal. And blues? Please! Eric's finesse as a blues man speaks for itself-he just gets better and better, plus his respect for those that came before him distinguishes him as a deeply intelligent player, too. Page, though, covered SO much ground in Zeppelin. Jimi and Eric perhaps had/have the upper hand in playing blues with a smoother overall technique, and Eric has given us wonderful ballads such as Tears in Heaven, but Jimmy dabbled in different folk elements that are virtually absent from the work of Clapton and Hendrix, while also able to produce work that was intensely powerful, dynamic and dramatic. If that's your cup of tea, I challenge you to find someone worthy of more praise. And no, Jerry played no metal-one of the few styles that apparently did not interest him-but beyond that . . . well, do I really need to sell anyone here on the notion that Jerry Garcia wasn't too shabby in his own right?

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Poster: Chris Freedom Date: Feb 23, 2007 10:27am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: So what Dylan tunes worked for the Dead?

Jerry may not have played metal but the guys in Iron Maiden were big fans of the dead. I had a picture of them in dead shirts when they played N.Y.C.

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Poster: Chris Freedom Date: Feb 23, 2007 8:21am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: So what Dylan tunes worked for the Dead?

Great post Bluedevil !
I am speechless

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